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Academic Skills

DS 103 Introduction to College Reading Skills

Introduction to College Reading Skills is designed to provide students with opportunities to improve understanding of written materials, reading comprehension strategies, and writing skills. The focus of this course will be on reading comprehension strategies such as vocabulary development, main idea/supportive detail comprehension and written communications. This is the first in a sequence of two reading classes. A grade of “C” or better is required in this class before enrollment in the next level reading class is permitted.

Prerequisites

  • COMPASS score of 0-65

Co-requisites


DS 1031 Reading Lab I

Reading Lab I is required for students taking Introduction to College Reading Skills. This lab is designed to provide students with additional support to enhance reading skills.


DS 123 College Reading Strategies

College Reading Strategies is designed for students to further develop general reading skills and college level reading strategies with an emphasis on higher levels of reading with vocabulary, comprehension, critical thinking and writing. A grade of “C” or better is required to exit this class.

Prerequisites

Co-requisites


DS 1231 Reading Lab II

Reading Lab II is required for students taking College Reading Strategies. This lab is designed to provide students with additional support to enhance reading skills.


RWS 1012 Reading and Writing Strategies Lab

Reading and Writing Strategies Lab provides the opportunity for significant individual guidance and support for key skills gaps. In addition, lab sessions will provide extensive self-paced practice using appropriate computer-based products to enhance reading and writing competence and fluency. Keyboarding experience is helpful but not required. This lab, along with RWS 1014, is an alternative, accelerated option for those students whose placement test scores indicate placement into DS 103/DS 1031 and EH 1013/EH 1011. Upon successful completion of RWS 1014 and this lab, students will be eligible for DS 123/DS 1231 and EH 1023/EH 1021.

Prerequisites

  • COMPASS Reading score 0-65 and Writing score 0-37

Co-requisites


RWS 1014 Reading and Writing Strategies

Reading and Writing Strategies is designed to increase competence and fluency in basic reading and writing. The course provides instruction in writing processes, grammar, mechanics, usage, vocabulary development, basic reading strategies, and literal and critical reading comprehension skills. Instructional activities include drafting, revising, and editing processes, the development of specific reading strategies, such as identification of main ideas and supporting details, and the development of literal and critical comprehension using material from diverse disciplines including material from college text. Keyboarding experience is helpful but not required. This course, along with RWS 1012, is an alternative, accelerated option for those students whose placement test scores indicate placement into DS 103/ DS 1031 and EH 1013/EH 1011. Upon successful completion of RWS 1012 and this class, students will be eligible for DS 123/DS 1231 and EH 1023/EH 1021.

Prerequisites

  • COMPASS Reading score 0-65 and Writing score 0-37.

Co-requisites


Advanced Manufacturing Technology

IN 114 Instrumentation Principles

Teaches the basic principles of physics, mechanics, electricity, fluid power, and electronics required for understanding instrumentation devices used by modern industrial complexes. 


IT 113 Industrial Safety and Sanitation

This course emphasizes the importance of safety and sanitation in an industrial setting, the design of Industrial Safety Programs and Safety Management. Attention is focused on meeting federal safety regulations, setting up safety programs, etc.


IT 1203 Intro to Manufacturing

This course is designed to introduce the student to the world of advanced manufacturing and establish a foundation upon which further studies in manufacturing might rest. Students will explore basic manufacturing materials and processes, tools, techniques and produce some more simple products.


IT 1213 Design for Manufacturing

This course is designed to expand on the introductory manufacturing course and to expose the student to the basic design concepts, computer skills, and drawing skills used in product and process design within the field of manufacturing. Additionally, the course is designed to expose students to a number of interpersonal skills and competencies necessary for a sustained career in manufacturing.


IT 1223 Manufacturing Production Processes

The course provides the student with a hands-on learning experience with the basic tools, equipment and operations of manufacturing industries. The student will understand the relationship between a manufacturing need, a design, materials and processes as well as tools and equipment.


IT 1233 Manufacturing Power & Equipment Systems

The course is designed to expand upon previous courses and allow students the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of power systems and use the advanced tools of manufacturing production. Students will plan, design, implement, use, and troubleshoot manufacturing power systems, equipment systems and control systems.


IT 1243 Manufacturing Materials

The course will introduce students to manufacturing materials, materials testing, and materials science. Additionally, this course will introduce students to primary and secondary processing and manufacturing and allow the student to instruct and conduct experiments with various manufacturing materials.


IT 1253 The Manufacturing Enterprise

The course is designed to expand upon concepts learned in introductory courses while allowing students to explore how manufacturing enterprises are established, how they maintain control, how they plan, how they produce, package, and market products. As a part of a product development team, students will analyze customer needs and market requirements, conceptualize a design, develop a prototype, production tooling and other procedures.


IT 1263 Manufacturing Equipment Maintenance and Operations

The course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive knowledge of manufacturing equipment safety, maintenance and operation procedures, control systems as well as leadership abilities in the field. 


IT 1273 Engineering Design & Problem Solving

The course will introduce some new concepts related to engineering design and problem solving, however, the primary function of this course will be to serve as a venue for students to place all previous learning into a manufacturing context. Students will solve a given manufacturing challenge that requires the use of advanced manufacturing technology systems, design skills, communication skills and a thorough understanding of manufacturing materials, processes and techniques. 


IT 133 Industrial Electricity

This course provides an introduction to the principles of both AC and DC electrical circuits. Emphasis is placed on industrial applications involving electric motors, controls and instrumentation.


IT 163 Basics of Blueprints & Industrial Measurements

This course covers the basic concepts and symbols of industrial blueprints. Students will also study and apply measurements in the metric and standard systems using conventional devices such as tape measures, decimal rules, micrometers, dial calipers and protractors. Some basic mathematical calculations common to industry will be explored and practiced.


IT 214 Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers

This course will provide students with the information required to begin using state-of-the-art programmable controllers. Students will cover information on programmable controller terminology, operation, and basic programs entry, coupled with hands-on lab experience to reinforce learning. Allen-Bradley’s programmable controllers are used in hands-on activities for demonstration.


IT 233 Contemporary Supervision

This course emphasizes the application of psychological principles as they are related to professional pursuits. Particular topics included are individual differences and group behavior involved in personnel selection, industrial safety and hygiene, motivation, personnel training, consumer behavior, human error, job analysis and human factor engineering.


IT 243 Industrial Fluid Mechanics

This course provides an introduction to the principles of the static and dynamic behavior of incompressible fluid flow. These principles are applied to problems involving hydraulics, pneumatics, and flow in pipes.


IT 253 Automated Production

This course covers the fundamental concepts associated with automation and production in contemporary industries as well as the analytical techniques and controls necessary for decision-making in production systems.


IT 263 Inventory Control

This course provides the student with an understanding of inventory classifications, modern inventory control methods, inventory optimization, and future trends in inventory control.


IT 273 Principles of Industrial Machines

This course introduces the principles involved in the performance of mechanical work. Various drive types, gears and belts for example, are analyzed for suitability of application and maintenance.


Agriculture, Food & Life Sciences

AFLS 1012 Careers in Agriculture

An introduction to the career opportunities within the discipline of agriculture. The student will be provided career information through lecture, video and multimedia presentations. Required of all degree programs. 


AFLS 1201 Rice Production

This course will cover rice production from field preparation to harvest. The participants will gain a basic understanding of rice growth and development, cultural practices, weed control, fertilization, disease control, insect control, and grain quality. This course is designed to be beneficial to anyone in an agriculturally related field. 


AFLS 1203 Introduction to Plant Science

Introduction to the principles and factors of plant growth, structure and development. 


AFLS 1211 Oilseed Production

This course will cover oilseed production from field preparation to harvest. The participants will gain a basic understanding of oilseed growth and development, cultural practices, weed control, fertilization, disease control, insect control and grain quality. This course is designed to be beneficial to anyone in an agriculturally related field. 


AFLS 1221 Wheat & Feed Grain Production

This course will cover wheat and feed grain production from field preparation to harvest. The participants will gain a basic understanding of the growth and development, cultural practices, weed control, fertilization, disease control, insect control and grain quality of crops used for human and animal consumption. This course is designed to be beneficial to anyone in an agriculturally related field. 


AFLS 1231 Integrated Pest Management

This course will provide an overview of integrated pest management systems utilizing chemicals, agricultural practices and natural predators for pest and disease control in field crop production. This course is designed to be beneficial to anyone in an agriculturally related field. 


AFLS 2000 Horticulture Lab

Laboratory exercises and site visits will provide the student with “hands-on” experience and practical application of the skills and techniques learned in the classroom. 


AFLS 2003 Principles of Horticulture

Classroom and laboratory application of the principles of plant propagation and production, the handling and use of plants in landscaping and horticultural crop production. Practical application and site tours will be provided through the co-requisite (AFLS 2000) laboratory. It is suggested that the student complete Botany prior to attempting this class. 


AFLS 2101 Crop Science Lab

Laboratory application and study to reinforce the principles of growth, development, reproduction, taxonomy and certain diseases of major field crops. 

Co-requisites


AFLS 2103 Crop Science

Prerequisite: AFLS 1203. Co-requisite: AFLS 2101. Principles of crop production and their application to the growth and development of major agronomic crop species. 


AFLS 2203 Small Engines/Power Units

Principles of operation, adjustment, repair, maintenance, and trouble shooting of small air-cooled engines and power units, including various engine systems, service, and maintenance of turf equipment and machinery. 


AGRI 123 Soil & Water Engineering

Skills and practices needed in soil and water management in agricultural operations. Emphasis on surveying and the design of systems to prevent erosion and increase productivity. 


AGRI 223 General Horticulture (GHM)

A survey of the general field of horticulture, including the growth, fruiting habits, propagation, and culture of horticultural plants. Emphasis is placed on the operation and management of greenhouse operations. 


AGRI 261 Ag Policy

This course will provide an overview of the direct impacts on agricultural businesses of the federal farm bill and interpreting governmental agencies. This course is designed to be beneficial to anyone in an agriculturally related field. 


AGRI 271 Ag Cooperatives

This course will provide an overview of the history, development and organizational structure of the various types of agricultural cooperatives. This course is designed to be beneficial to anyone in an agriculturally related field. 


AGRI 281 Ag Marketing

This course will provide an overview of the processes, procedures and regulations involved in the marketing of agricultural crops. This course is designed to be beneficial to anyone in an agriculturally related field. 


Art

ART 123 Design

A study of three-dimensional organization in the development of visual expression. 


ART 133 Free Hand Drawing and Design

Drawing from figures, objects and outdoor sketching, including organization of two-dimensional space and sound design elements and principles. 


ART 143 Drawing

A continuation of ART 133. 

Prerequisites


ART 203 Art for the Public School Teacher

A study of the creative growth of children; methods and techniques necessary for the direction of a creative art program in the public schools. Experience with appropriate art materials. 


ART 263 Art Seminar

Students will work in the studio on projects in their chosen discipline. 

Prerequisites

  • Minimum of one art class.

Behavioral Health

BH 103 Health Care Delivery

This course provides a history of the development of health care in the United States. It focuses on health care delivery issues and current trends in health care management. 


BH 113 Chronic and Infectious Disease

This survey course introduces the student to chronic disorders and infectious diseases. There is a strong emphasis on disorders afflicting the elderly. Safety and security, infection control, HIV/AIDS, and blood borne diseases will be discussed. 


BH 123 (SOCI 2013) Theories and Treatment of Social Problems

Theories and Treatments of Social Problems, BH 123 (SOCI 2013), is an introductory course examining theories and treatment of major social problems faced by society. The course focuses on the study of identification, intervention, assessment, and referral and is grounded in sociological principles of investigation. The course also reviews reactions to health/behavioral health related problems. 


BH 133 Behavioral Health Issues: Drug Abuse, Dom. Violence/Abuse, Case Management

This course examines three distinct concerns of behavioral health technology: substance abuse, domestic violence/abuse, and case management. The class emphasizes prevention, detection, and intervention by case workers and the ethical and legal responsibilities of case management. 


BH 143 Practicum in Behavioral Health

The Behavioral Health Practicum provides field experience in a behavioral health/ human service environment. Students will be assigned a field observer who will supervise the student’s ability to apply classroom theory to the behavioral health/human service practice. 


BH 153 Practicum Seminar in Behavioral Health

The Behavioral Health Practicum Seminar provides an opportunity for students to discuss practical applications of classroom theory and allows interaction among practicum students. Students will plan, implement, and evaluate practicum. Further, written documentation of the practicum experience will be completed in this class. 


Biology

BY 103 Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology

An introduction to the study of the human body designed for students in non-transfer programs or those with little prior study in the biological sciences.

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment.


BY 1131 Biology Lab

This is a laboratory course in general biology covering the general use of the microscope, cell organization, physical and chemical bases of life, cell reproduction, plant tissue structures, and lower animal tissue structures. This course is offered only to students who have three credit hours of lecture in General Biology, BY 114, or its equivalence. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


BY 114 (BIOL 1014) General Biology I

General Biology I (BIOL 1014) is a lecture-laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with basic biological principles related to: chemistry of cells; cell structure and function; mitosis and meiosis; DNA structure and protein synthesis; evolution and taxonomy; viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi; invertebrates; animal behavior and population ecology.

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment.


BY 1231 Biology Lab

This is a laboratory course in general Biology covering topics related to higher plants and animals, and introductory genetics. This course is offered only to students who have three credit hours of lecture in the second course in General Biology, BY 124, or its equivalence. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


BY 124 (BIOL 1024) General Biology II

Offered during spring semester.

General Biology II (BIOL 1024) is a lecture-laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with basic biological principles related to: basic processes and features of vascular and nonvascular plants; photosynthesis; heredity; morphology and evolution of selected invertebrates; and basic human anatomy & physiology.

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment.


BY 134 (BIOL 1054) General Zoology

Offered during fall semester of even years.

General Zoology is a detailed study of the animal kingdom. Includes the introduction to zoological principles relating to cells, organ systems, development, genetics, ecology, evolution, embryonic development and animal phyla.

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment.


BY 144 (BIOL 1034) General Botany

Offered during fall semester of odd years.

A detailed study of the form structure, function, and reproduction of plants.

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment.


BY 154 (BIOL 2404) Anatomy & Physiology I

Anatomy & Physiology I, BY 154 (BIOL 2404), is a lecture-laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with the structures and functions of the systems of the human body. This course explores the mechanisms of the body’s components under ideal conditions, and their dysfunction under adverse conditions. Included in this exploration are the trends in medical research and clinical applications of this research. At the end of this course, students will have a working knowledge and application of anatomy and physiology to continue further in their selected health science field and will have adequate knowledge of the discipline to enter and succeed in their chosen health care profession.

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment.

Prerequisites

  • College-level placement in English and reading or successful completion of required developmental courses.

BY 163 Anatomy & Physiology I (Selected Topics)

A lecture course dealing with the structure, function, and integrated activity of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. No laboratory practice is required. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 

Prerequisites

  • Department approval.

BY 164 (BIOL 2414) Anatomy & Physiology II

Anatomy & Physiology II, BY 164 (BIOL 2414), is a lecture-laboratory course designed to continue the student’s familiarization with the structures and functions of the systems of the human body. This course explores the mechanisms of the body’s components under ideal conditions, and their dysfunction under adverse conditions. Included in this exploration are the trends in medical research and clinical applications of this research. At the end of this course, students will have adequate knowledge and application of anatomy and physiology to continue further in their selected health science field and will have sufficient knowledge of the discipline to enter and succeed in their chosen health care professions.

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment.

Prerequisites


BY 201 Special Topics in Biological Science

Readings and/or projects in selected disciplines of the biological sciences will be assigned. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 

Prerequisites

  • Departmental approval and consent by the instructor who will direct the work.

BY 202 Special Topics in Biological Science

Readings and/or projects in selected disciplines of the biological sciences will be assigned. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 

Prerequisites

  • Department approval and consent by the instructor who will direct the work.

BY 223 Environmental Science

Scientific and social perspectives of environmental and resource problems. This is an ideal course for general education students, and gives them an introduction to ecology and field biology. It is designed for students entering the disciplines of biology, wildlife science and forestry. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


BY 224 (BIOL 2004) Microbiology

Designed to give fundamentals of morphology, taxonomy, ecology, and physiology and the economic importance of micro-organisms. Included are basic techniques of staining, culturing, and sterilization. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all biology courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


Business Administration

BAN 103 Introduction to Accounting

Elementary accounting principles, including lectures, problems, and laboratory practices. Emphasis on procedures, forms, and practical application. 


BAN 113 (BUSI 1013) Introduction to Business

An introduction to business organization and procedure. 


BAN 213 (ACCT 2003) Principles of Accounting I

Introduction to financial accounting principles and problems as they apply to service and merchandising businesses. Emphasis will be placed on the accounting equation and the accounting cycle to include analysis of business transactions, internal control, and preparation of financial statements to be used by business stakeholders. 

Prerequisites


BAN 223 (ACCT 2013) Principles of Accounting II

A continuation of BAN 213 (ACCT 2003). Introduction to managerial ac- counting with an emphasis on partnerships, corporation, manufacturing cost flow systems, and applying the budgeting process. Cost and budget accounting will be introduced as well as analysis and interpretation of special/budget reports, corporate financial statements, and cost reports. 

Prerequisites


BAN 233 (BLAW 2003) Legal Environment of Business

A study of fundamental principles of law that apply to important business transactions. The legal principles of contracts, agency and employment, negotiable instruments and bailments. 


BAN 263 (BUSI 2013) Business Communication

Theories and principles of nonverbal, oral, and written communication; emphasis on basic writing skills as applied in composing a variety of letters, memorandums, and resumes. 


BAN 283 Computerized Accounting

This course provides an innovative, integrated learning software package that covers the major components of a computerized accounting system. 


Business Management

BMGT 213 Principles of Banking

This course covers the practical aspects of banking and emphasizes the basic monetary theory needed by the banking student. Fall semester or as requested. 


BMGT 233 Principles of Management

Factors that provide a foundation for management practices. Evolution of management, management science, behavioral theory, organization theory, systems concepts, and managerial techniques in planning, organizing, directing and controlling. 


BMGT 273 Business Management Internship

Student will apply for and be assigned to an approved organization during their last semester under the direct supervision of a management executive and general supervision of the program coordinator. Student will gain experience in combining classroom theory with on-the-job training. 

Prerequisites

  • Department approval.

BMGT 283 (BUSI 2103) Business Statistics

Statistical methods used in studying business and economic data, averages and dispersions, probability, sampling, statistical inference, estimation, tests of hypothesis, index numbers, linear regression and correlation. 

Prerequisites


Chemistry

CY 104 (CHEM 1214) Chemistry I for Health Sciences: Introduction to Chemistry

Offered during fall semester

This is an algebra based course designed for majors in the health sciences or students with basic skills needs in general chemistry. The course content includes nomenclature, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, and reactions. This course is appropriate only as a review course for chemistry, other science or pre-professional majors. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all chemistry courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of non-expendable equipment. 


CY 113 General Chemistry (Selected Topics)

A lecture course covering the subject matter of the first semester of general chemistry. No laboratory practice is required. This course offering is contingent upon a 19 on ACT and enrolled or have taken, MS 123 (MATH 1103), College Algebra, prior approval of both instructor and department chairman. 

Prerequisites


CY 1131 General Chemistry (Selected Topics)

This lab is offered only to students enrolled in CY 113 online or to students who have received credit for CY 113. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all chemistry courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of non-expendable equipment. 


CY 114 (CHEM 1414) General Chemistry I

General Chemistry I, CY 114 (CHEM 1414), covers the basic principles of chemistry with emphasis upon stoichiometry, periodic properties of the elements and the correlation between electronic configurations of the elements and these properties. The laboratory emphasizes both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of chemistry. Co-requisites for this course are College Algebra (MS 123 (MATH 1103)) and Applied Mathematics for Students of Science (MS 213).

Prerequisites

  • High School algebra or department approval.

Co-requisites


CY 123 General Chemistry (Selected Topics)

A lecture course covering the subject matter of the second semester of general chemistry. No laboratory practice is required. This course offering is contingent upon prior approval of both instructor and department chairman.

Prerequisites


CY 124 (CHEM 1424) General Chemistry II

General Chemistry II, CY 124 (CHEM 1424), is a continuation of CY 114 (CHEM 1414). This course treats in detail the states of matter, the energy relationships involved in physical and chemical changes, equilibrium and kinetics. Prerequisites for this course are MS 123 (MATH 1103) (College Algebra), CY 114 (CHEM 1414) (General Chemistry I), and MS 213 (Applied Math for Science Students) or department approval. The laboratory emphasizes quantitative analysis. 


CY 204 (CHEM 1224) Chemistry II for Health Sciences: An Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry

Chemistry II for Health Sciences: An Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry, CY 204 (CHEM 1224), is a one-semester survey course treating simple nomenclature, the chemical and physical properties of organic compounds and the structure and function of the major classes of physiologically important compounds. This course is designed to give students of health sciences a basic knowledge of organic and biochemistry. A text that combines inorganic, organic and biochemistry is used. Some knowledge on the part of the student of inorganic chemistry is assumed. 


CY 213 Organic Chemistry (Selected Topics)

A lecture course covering the subject matter of the first semester of organic chemistry. No laboratory practice is required. This course offering is contingent upon prior approval of both instructor and department chairman.

Prerequisites


CY 214 Organic Chemistry I

A unified course designed to provide the student with a knowledge of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds. Their nomenclature, classification, derivatives, and general reactions are emphasized. 


CY 223 Organic Chemistry (Selected Topics)

A continuation of CY 213, emphasizing structure-reaction relationship and mechanistic pathways. There is no laboratory requirement for this course.


CY 224 Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of CY 214, emphasizing structure-reaction relationships and mechanistic pathways. 


Computer Technology

CT 113 (CPSI 1003) Computer Information Systems

This course introduces computer terminology and concepts. Students will have “hands-on” experience using Microsoft Office, which includes word processing, database, spreadsheet, and presentations. Students will also have “hands- on” training using email and the Internet. 

Prerequisites

  • Keyboarding and/or computer skills.

CT 1233 Advanced MS Office Applications

This course focuses on the advanced concepts of Word, Excel, and Powerpoint. 

Prerequisites


CT 1243 Web Design II

This course focuses on website and artistic creation utilizing web development applications. Dreamweaver, Flash, and Fireworks will be used in media creation, interactivity, layout and design. 

Prerequisites


CT 1283 Integrated Office Projects

Students will integrate software skills in Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint using business-oriented projects. This capstone course should be taken during the final semester. 


CT 164 Introduction to Programming

This course introduces the student to the fundamental concepts and use of object-oriented programming to create applications in a windows environment using Visual Basic programming language. The student will also learn to use the three programming structures: sequential, selection, repetition. 

Prerequisites


CT 173 Network Administration

This course introduces the vocabulary, concepts, and uses of networking. The students will also be involved in activities that provide hands on networking experience using Windows Server and Active Directory. 

Prerequisites


CT 213 Microcomputer Business Applications

This course is designed to give the student theory as well as “hands-on” experience with popular software packages, such as a data base, spreadsheet, and word processing. 

Prerequisites

  • Keyboarding and/or computer skills.

CT 233 Web Design I

This course will teach Website design and management techniques using Dreamweaver to publish online. Topics include HTML, planning and creating new websites, tables, forms, templates, style sheets, layers, image maps, navigation bars, and animation. 

Prerequisites


CT 264 Programming in C#

This course focuses on advanced programming concepts using Microsoft C#. Students will develop applications using decision structure, method calling, arrays, and parameter passing. 


CT 273 Relational Database Applications

This course introduces the student to a general knowledge of database design, administration, and application development using Microsoft Access.

Prerequisites


Cosmetology

COSM 101 Hygiene and Sanitation I

Students will learn basic concepts of maintaining a healthy body and mind, communicating effectively, and establishing good human relations. 


COSM 104 Hairstyling I

This course includes a basic study of the properties of the hair and scalp as well as principles of hair care and design including cutting, wet styling, thermal styling, permanent waving, hair coloring, chemical relaxing and working with artificial hair. 


COSM 106 Clinical Experience I

Students gain experience in application of basic theoretical concepts in hairstyling, manicuring, and aesthetics using mannequins, students, and outside patrons. Under supervision of a licensed instructor, the clinic is operated as an actual beauty salon business. 


COSM 111 Cosmetology Science I

This course is an introductory study of human anatomy, bacteriology, physiology and cells. The basics of chemistry and electricity will also be emphasized. 


COSM 121 Manicuring I

This course is an introductory study of the nail structure and its disorders. Basic and specialty manicures, pedicures and massages are taught using proper safety procedures. 


COSM 131 Aesthetics I

This course is an introductory study of histology of the skin, skin care, hair removal, and facial makeup. 


COSM 141 Salon Industry I

This course is an introductory study of all phases of salon operation including salesmanship, shop management, and shop deportment. 


COSM 1510 Cosmetology Manicuring Lab

Students develop manicuring skills through practical application. Requires 375 contact hours.


COSM 153 Nail Technology

The study of the nails, its parts, diseases, and the anatomy as applied to the hands and arms. 


COSM 155 Cosmetology Manicuring Theory

This lecture course covers the principles of manicuring and pedicuring. 


COSM 201 Hygiene and Sanitation II

Students will learn fundamental concepts of maintaining a healthy body and mind, communicating effectively, and establishing good human relations.


COSM 204 Hairstyling II

This course is a continued study of the properties of the hair and scalp as well as principles of hair care and design including cutting, wet styling, thermal styling, permanent waving, hair coloring, chemical relaxing and working with artificial hair. 


COSM 206 Clinical Experience II

Students gain experience in application of fundamental theoretical concepts in hairstyling, manicuring, and aesthetics using mannequins, students, and outside patrons. Under supervision of a licensed instructor, the clinic is operated as an actual beauty salon business. 


COSM 211 Cosmetology Science II

This course is a continued study of human anatomy, bacteriology, physiology and cells. The basics of chemistry and electricity will also be emphasized. 


COSM 221 Manicuring II

This course is a continued study of the nail structure and its disorders. Basic and specialty manicures, pedicures and massages are taught using proper safety procedures. 


COSM 231 Aesthetics II

This course is a continued study of histology of the skin, skin care, hair removal and facial makeup. 


COSM 241 Salon Industry II

This course is a continued study of all phases of salon operation including salesmanship, shop management and shop deportment. 


COSM 293 Special Problems

Training in subjects in which student may be deficient and/or the practice of cosmetology. 


COSM 301 Hygiene and Sanitation III

Students will learn advanced concepts of maintaining a healthy body and mind, communicating effectively, and establishing good human relations. 


COSM 304 Hairstyling III

This course is an advanced study of the properties of the hair and scalp as well as principles of hair care and design including cutting, wet styling, thermal styling, permanent waving, hair coloring, chemical relaxing and working with artificial hair. 


COSM 306 Cosmetology Theory and Practical Application

Includes instruction on all aspects of cosmetology. Practical application on mannequins, students and outside patrons in clinical setting is emphasized. 


COSM 311 Cosmetology Science III

This course is an advanced study of human anatomy, bacteriology, physiology and cells. The basics of chemistry and electricity will also be emphasized.


COSM 321 Manicuring III

This course is an advanced study of the nail structure and its disorders. Basic and specialty manicures, pedicures, and massages are taught using proper safety procedures. 


COSM 331 Aesthetics III

This course is an advanced study of histology of the skin, skin care, hair removal, and facial makeup. 


COSM 341 Salon Industry III

This course is an advanced study of all phases of salon operation including salesmanship, shop management and shop deportment. 


COSM 406 Clinical Experience III

Students gain experience in application of advanced theoretical concepts in hairstyling, manicuring, and aesthetics using mannequins, students and outside patrons. Under supervision of a licensed instructor, the clinic is operated as an actual beauty salon business. 


Criminal Justice

CJI 103 Law Enforcement

The focus of this course will be on society and the criminal justice system. This instructional program prepares individuals to perform the duties of police and public security officers, including patrol and investigative activities, traffic control, crowd control, and public relations. There is an emphasis on understanding society and the importance of community relations. 


CJI 1103 Special Topics in Law Enforcement

This course is a continuation of CJI 103. It introduces the student to special topics in law enforcement with an emphasis on society, the criminal justice system, and community relations. 


CJI 1123 Special Topics in Advanced Law Enforcement

This course is a continuation of CJI 123. It introduces the student to special topics in corrections, policing, security, and other enforcement.


CJI 113 (CRJU 1023) Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course is an introduction to the history, philosophy, evolution, and organization of law enforcement in a democratic society. There is an orientation to agencies involved in the administration of criminal justice. This course focuses on law enforcement, the court system, and the corrections system with an emphasis on examining American criminal justice as an interdisciplinary field of study which reflects the attitudes, values and beliefs of a democratic culture. 


CJI 123 Advanced Law Enforcement

This course is an introduction to corrections, policing, security, and other enforcement. This instructional program prepares individuals to perform the duties of police and public security officers, including patrol and investigative activities, traffic control, crowd control, public relations, and witness interviewing.


CJI 143 Juvenile Justice

This course introduces students to issues and trends of juvenile delinquency and provides a background of the social problems which perpetuate delinquency. A detailed study of theories related to the macro and micro perspectives of crime among delinquents will be examined including the biological, psychological, and social roots of delinquency. In addition, students will learn the history and evolution of the juvenile justice system. 


Drafting

DR 104 Introduction to CAD I

Introduction to computer graphics. This course applies drafting skills to the computer in basic programming, working drawings and dimensioning. Use of plotters and printers is also taught. 


DR 114 Introduction to CAD II

This course is designed to apply the drafting skills learned in DR 104 to computer graphics. This course should allow the student who masters the course to transfer through computer languages and menu technique, drafting skills of geometric construction, orthographic projections, isometric developments and dimensioning directly into the CAD computer for immediate programming and printout. 


Early Childhood Education

ECD 1001 Field Experience I

This course provides practical field experience in the methods of early childhood education, the use of early childhood education materials, and the application of the six competency goals and thirteen functional areas of child development. A fee of $350 will be assessed to this course. 


ECD 1003 Fundamentals of Childcare

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical roles of families in their child’s development. The student will become familiar with the theories supporting early childhood education and learn how to develop an effective program designed uniquely for children (ages birth to eight). The students will also obtain knowledge of state and federal laws pertaining to the care and education of young children. 


ECD 103 Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical roles of families in their childs development. The student will become familiar with the theories supporting Early Childhood Education and learn how to develop an effective program designed uniquely for children (ages birth to 8). The students will also obtain knowledge of state and federal laws pertaining to the care and education of young children. 


ECD 1101 Field Experience II

Students will apply methods of Early Childhood Education, use materials designed for children, and develop an early childhood curriculum guide for use in the classroom. A fee of $375 will be assessed to cover this course. 


ECD 1103 Child Development

The study and recognition of maturational and environmental factors in children’s growth and development. An emphasis on cognitive language, sensorimotor, and physical development in children from birth to six years of age will be examined in this course. 


ECD 113 Health, Safety & Nutrition

This course is designed to provide the student with a broad knowledge base to design an early childhood education program that will meet the needs for children. It will provide the opportunity for students to design environments that are physically and emotionally secure. Further, students will plan and implement activities that are age, stage, and culturally appropriate for children from birth to five years. The framework for this course is based on the guidelines established by the Council for Early Childhood for Professional Recognition. Students will also examine the impact of multiculturalism on child development. 


ECD 1203 Application of Childcare

This course is designed to provide the student with a broad knowledge base to design an early childhood education program that will meet the needs for children. It will provide the opportunity for students to design environments that are physically and emotionally secure. Further, students will plan and implement activities that are age, stage, and culturally appropriate for children from birth to five years. The framework for this course is based on the guidelines established by the Council for Early Childhood for Professional Recognition. Students will also examine the impact of multiculturalism on child development. 


ECD 181 Management Practice for Child Care Centers

Management regulations and competencies will be examined. Issues relating to managing personnel, finances, and other variables in a child care center will be included in this study. Legal issues which apply to or affect early childhood care centers will be discussed. 


ECD 201 CDA Renewal/Running and Maintaining a Daycare Business

Designed for students seeking CDA renewal. This class reviews the paperwork and documentation required to maintain family daycare and preschool programs. Various legal concerns will be examined. 


ECD 203 CE CORE

Early Childhood Education curriculum, organization, reading, and expression introduce students to specific strategies for preschool teachers and include content related to curriculum, organization, reading, and language expression. 

Prerequisites

  • Core knowledge.

ECD 213 Child Guidance

This course relates principles of child development to appropriate methods of guiding children’s behavior for children Birth through Pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs. Techniques for managing groups of children in the various childcare settings are practiced. 

Prerequisites


ECD 223 Math & Science for ECED

This course will introduce students to a variety of age appropriate concepts and methods in mathematics and science. Students will develop activities, make or obtain manipulatives; plan and practice developmentally appropriate experiences that meet standards recognized by NAEYC, NCTM and others. 

Prerequisites


ECD 243 Infant/Toddler Curriculum

This course is based on the foundation of research in child development and focuses on planning and implementing enriching environments with appropriate interactions and activities for young children (birth through two) including those with special needs, to maximize physical, cognitive, communication, creative, language/literacy, and social/emotional growth and development. Competencies are based on Standards developed by the National Association for the Education of Young Children for quality early childhood settings. Also covered: 1) Information on the Quality Approval process and Accreditation for Early Childhood settings in Arkansas, now called Better Beginnings and 2) Arkansas Frameworks Handbook for Infants and Toddlers. 

Prerequisites


ECD 253 Literacy and Language Arts

This course is designed to make the early childhood educator aware of the acquisition of language and how to provide children birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs with language rich environments by incorporating the four areas of language: speaking, listening, writing and reading. 

Prerequisites


ECD 263 Preschool Curriculum

Students must be employed or volunteer in a licensed childcare facility to apply the knowledge acquired and skills learned in previous coursework. Observation of the student’s work and evaluation of student skills are conducted by instructors following the NAEYC Associate Standards. Students must demonstrate competency in all areas observed and complete a minimum number of clock hours, determined by the institution, of observation and work experience with children birth to five. An emphasis will be on the observation of physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional development in connection with previous courses. 

Prerequisites


ECD 283 Future Perspectives

This course introduces students to current research in the field of early childhood education. Students will develop a knowledge base of the NAEYC Code of Conduct through analyzing case studies designed to demonstrate competencies compatible with current research and practice, development of a professional portfolio to demonstrate competencies in the skills relating to the NAEYC Associate Degree Standards. 

Prerequisites


ECD 293 Practicum

Students must be employed or volunteer in a licensed childcare facility to apply the knowledge acquired and skills learned in previous coursework. Observation of the student’s work and evaluation of student skills are conducted by instructors following the NAEYC Associate Standards. Students must demonstrate competency in all areas observed and complete a minimum number of clock hours, determined by the institution, of observation and work experience with children birth to five. An emphasis will be on the observation of physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional development in connection with previous courses. 

Prerequisites


Economics

ES 213 (ECON 2103) Principles of Macroeconomics

An introduction to the principles of economics. This course deals with the “grand total” of economic activity as well as inflation, unemployment, fiscal, and monetary policy. 


ES 223 (ECON 2203) Principles of Microeconomics

A continuation of ES 213 (ECON 2103), including the behavior of decision makers in the economy, taxation, income distribution, and current economic problems. 

Prerequisites


Education

EMT 101 EMT Refresher

This course follows the USDOT National Standard Curriculum and provides 24 hours of refresher training. Information provided assists Arkansas certified or nationally registered EMT-Basics to meet recertification requirements. 


EN 1001 American Sign Language

This one credit hour workshop will introduce participants to the basics of communication using American Sign Language. 


EN 113 Introduction to Education

Introduction to the history, principles, techniques, and objectives of public education. Thirty-two hours of field based experience is required. 


EN 183 Driver’s Education

Students must have a license or permit before they are allowed to attend the driving labs. This class prepares students to be safe and defensive drivers. The students attend lecture classes and 8-9 driving lessons. This course helps to decrease insurance rates. 


EN 213 Computers in Education

This course is designed for those students expressing an interest in teaching. Emphasis will be placed on actual development of computer operating skills, computer literacy and computer user competency in software, e-portfolios, and the web. Students will also explore the teaching and learning potential of current and emerging educational technology.


EN 223 Testing Seminar

This course is designed to prepare students to pass the PRAXIS I/PPST Assessment, which is required for all students to enter teacher education programs within the State of Arkansas. Students enrolled in this class must take the PRAXIS I test in all areas that they have not yet successfully completed. Successful completion of all three areas is required to earn an Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT). A $130 testing fee will be assessed to this course, which is the Educational Testing Service (ETS) cost to take the combined tests. 


Emergency Medical Technician

EMT 1010 Emergency Medical Training

This course follows the USDOT National Standard Curriculum for EMT-Basic. Medical emergencies and traumatic injuries, with emphasis on life-threatening conditions, are explored. Skills taught include management of oral and nasopharyngeal airways, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), use of an automated external defibrillator (AED), as well as spinal immobilization and splinting. Additionally, students are trained to assist individuals with self-administered medications and automobile extrication. Upon successful completion of this course, students are eligible to apply to take the State of Arkansas and National Registry EMT-Basic practical and written examinations for certification. 


EMT 102 First Responders

This course follows the USDOT National Standard Curriculum and includes 40 hours of first responder training. It is designed for firefighters, law enforcement officers, and industrial emergency responders who stabilize a victim until the arrival of community EMS providers. Emphasis is placed on recognition and understanding of life-threatening medical emergencies and traumatic injuries. Skills taught include cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), use of an automated defibrillator (AED), management of oxygen therapy, as well as spinal immobilization and splinting. 


English

EH 1011 Basic Writing I Lab

Computer lab setting designed to assist students with grammar/mechanics skills through exercises, writing and tutorial instruction. 

Co-requisites


EH 1013 Basic Writing I

This course is a non-transferable basic writing course designed to promote writing competence and fluency. It focuses on writing, reading, and grammar skills. Students will receive individual help in reading, vocabulary, sentence construction, and paragraph writing. Students who complete all course work with a “C” grade or better are eligible for the next level of Basic Writing II, EH 1023.


EH 1021 Basic Writing II Lab

Computer lab setting designed to assist students in reinforcing writing skills studied in the classroom through practice and tutoring/instruction.

Co-requisites


EH 1023 Basic Writing II

This course is a non-transferable writing course designed to promote competence and fluency. It prepares the student for the language and writing skills necessary for advancing to Composition I. Students who complete this course work with a “C” grade or better are eligible for Composition I, EH 113 (ENGL 1013).

Prerequisites

Co-requisites


EH 1111 APA Research

This workshop/class will introduce students to internet and library research as well as the APA method of documentation. 


EH 113 (ENGL 1013) Composition I

Composition I, EH 113 (ENGL 1013), is designed to aid students in improving their writing skills by developing expository and persuasive composition, to do research and develop a research paper, with APA documentation, and to give them experience with the computer. Passages from the text, written by both students and professional writers, will serve as guides to the students in composing their own papers on the computer. 

Prerequisites

  • 45 on ASSET Writing Skills or 75 on Compass Language Usage, 19 on ACT English, 470 or higher in verbal portion of the Recentered SAT, or a C or higher in EH 1023 Basic Writing II

Co-requisites


EH 123 (ENGL 1023) Composition II

Composition II, EH 123 (ENGL 1023), is a continuation of EH 113 (ENGL 1013) and surveys fiction and drama. The intent of the course is to provide students inexperienced in the critical reading of literature with the basic skills needed to understand, evaluate and write about a work of literature.

Prerequisites


EH 233 (ENGL 2113) World Literature I

World Literature I, EH 233 (ENGL 2113), introduces students to literature from the Ancient period through the Renaissance. Historical development of the eras and global literary themes will be explored to expand the cultural backgrounds of the students. Students are required to read all assigned material before class sessions.

Prerequisites


EH 243 (ENGL 2123) World Literature II

World Literature II, EH 243 (ENGL 2123), is designed to enhance the students’ cultural backgrounds via selected literary works that span eras from the Neoclassical period through the period of Contemporary literature emphasizing movements, schools, and periods. Literary themes and devices will be explored, along with the major historical development of the eras.

Prerequisites


EH 263 (ENGL 2663) African American Literature

African-American Literature, EH 263 (ENGL 2663), examines the major trends in African-American Literature using historical, political, and social contexts. Students will study works from the Colonial Era to the present. Examples from all literary genres will be included. The literature reflects that African American literature is a product of American literature which includes: Early American Literature (Colonial), Antebellum Literature, American Renaissance, 19th Century, Late 19th Century, 20th Century, Modernism, Postmodern (Contemporary). The African-American literary trends examined include Colonial, Abolition and Reconstruction (Antebellum), Nadir (Late 19th Century and Early 20th Century), Black Renaissance (20th Century); Protest (Modernism), Civil Rights, and Women’s Era (Contemporary). 


EH 271 Writing Popular Fiction

Workshop on writing and publishing popular fiction. This course includes identification of genre fiction which must meet reader expectations (mysteries, science fiction, western, romance, horror, gothic) and writing technique. 


EH 273 (ENGL 2023) Technical Writing

Technical Writing, EH 273 (ENGL 2023), is a study, discussion, and writing of technical descriptions, abstracts, business communications, lab reports, and research reports. This course is required for people majoring in technical, scientific, and business areas. It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed EH 113 (ENGL 1013)(Composition I) with a “C” or better. 


EH 283 (ENGL 2013) Creative Writing

Creative Writing, EH 283 (ENGL 2013), offers practical experience in the techniques of writing poetry and fiction. 


EH 293 Film & Literature

A study of the traditional forms of literature through the use of film, literature, and critical papers. 


SP 243 (SPCH 1003) Fundamentals of Speech

A fundamentals course dealing with human communications from daily experiences to public speaking situations. Some emphasis is placed on enunciation and articulation.


SS 101 Student Success I

This course is designed to help students develop skills, knowledge and habits which will maximize their academic performance, improve personal interactions, explore and target career goals, and improve personal skills which impact scholastic achievement. It covers topics such as memory, note-taking, test-taking, study skills, conflict resolution, financial and time management.

Co-requisites


SS 110 Student Success II

This student success course is designed to help students develop a learning system for attaining maximum success in college, in work, and in life. This course focuses on critical thinking, interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, employability skills, leadership development, conflict resolution, financial management, and service learning.

For students enrolled in PN and ADN Allied Health Programs. 


SS 111 Student Success II

This student success course is designed to help students develop a learning system for attaining maximum success in college, in work, and in life. This course focuses on critical thinking, interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, employability skills, leadership development, conflict resolution, financial management, and service learning.


Fine Arts

FA 213 (ARTA 1003) Fine Arts

Fine Arts, FA 213 (ARTA 1003), will include instruction and observation of creative human expression concentrating on the Fine Arts. In order to develop a more informed understanding of fine arts of our past and present civilizations, the course will trace the history of visual art and its influences on civilization and contemporary society. This course is a survey of architecture, sculpture, and painting in Western culture, from the beginnings of time through ancient Greece, the Renaissance, the Baroque period, and the Modern period to the present. 


French

FH 113 (FREN 1013) Beginning French I

French I, FH 113 (FREN 1013), is designed to help students develop basic skills and build vocabulary through daily speaking, writing and reading French. Class-time is devoted to explanation, written and oral practice. Homework will focus on reading, writing and pronunciation. Handouts, in-class discussions and projects will promote cultural awareness. French I is a beginning course designed to help students develop a basic proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The instruction includes interactive communication and emphasizes the everyday life and culture of French-speaking people. 


FH 123 (FREN 1023) Beginning French II

Beginning French II, FH 123 (FREN 1023), is a continuation of FH 113 (FREN 1013) and it is designed to help students develop basic skills and building vocabulary through daily speaking, writing and reading French. Class time is devoted to explanation, written and oral practice. Homework will focus on reading, writing and pronunciation. Handouts, in-class discussions and projects will promote cultural awareness. 

Prerequisites


FH 213 (FREN 2013) Intermediate French I

Intermediate French I, FH 213 (FREN 2013), seeks to further develop a basic proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The instruction stresses communication, is interaction oriented, and emphasizes the every day life and culture of French-speaking people. Class time is devoted to explanation, oral and written practice. Homework will focus on speaking, reading, writing and pronunciation. Handouts, in-class discussions, and projects will promote cultural awareness. 

Prerequisites


FH 223 (FREN 2023) Intermediate French II

Intermediate French II, FH 223, is a continuation of FH 213 (FREN 2013). It is designed to help students develop an intermediate-level of proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The in- struction is communicatively oriented and emphasizes the everyday life and culture of French speaking people. It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed FH 213 (FREN 2013) with a “C” or better. 


Freshman Seminar

SOS 103 Freshman Seminar

This course provides individuals with the opportunity to cultivate skills, values, and attitudes necessary to become confident and capable students. College procedures, facilities, and services are introduced and students are assisted to identify career goals. 


SOS 111 Study Skills and Strategies in Mathematics

The emphasis of this course will be to assist students in learning techniques and strategies that will help them perform better in mathematics. Topics to be covered include: reducing math anxiety, listening and note taking skills, reading and homework study techniques, remembering what you have learned, and test taking skills. 


Geography

GEOG 213 (GEOG 1103) Introductory Geography

Introductory Geography, GEOG 213 (GEOG 1103), is a survey of the physical and cultural characteristics of the world environment. The course examines the inter-relationships between humankind and the physical world through the student’s understanding of maps, terms, devices and methods employed by geographers in their study of people and places. 


Graphic Communications

PR 103 Graphic Art & Design I

A visual communication of specific ideas in a clean and exact manner. Assignments include illustration and graphic symbolism using computers and laser printers for designing purposes. 


PR 113 Graphic Art & Design II

A continuation of Graphic Art & Design I with emphasis on package design, client presentation, an advertising campaign utilizing the print media such as direct mail, point of purchase and billboard illustration. 


PR 114 Printmaking

Allows students to explore traditional and contemporary printmaking processes while creating indelible multiples or one-of-a-kind prints of your own images. Topics include woodcut, intaglio, serigraphy, lithography, calligraphy and monotype and a history of each. 


PR 123 Graphic Design Typography

An exploration of letter forms and the crucial role they play in graphic design. Includes handcrafted calligraphy and computer manipulated characters. Emphasis is placed on choosing typefaces and applying them creatively. 


PR 133 Illustration I

In this introduction to the fundamentals of drawing for illustration, freehand sketching, perspective, and drafting techniques are covered. Emphasis is on tight rendering. Projects include spot drawings, pencil, pen and ink, two-color, and technical/project illustration. 


PR 143 Illustration II

A continuation of Illustration I. Emphasis is on conceptual development and the application of various media and techniques examined through contemporary illustrators. Students are assigned a variety of projects with realistic limitations. Assignments may include fairy tales, fables, book illustration, trade publishing, non-fiction, and editorial assignments. 

Prerequisites


PR 164 Digital Photography

An introduction to the basic concepts of digital photography and preparing the images for print through applied studio problems. 


PR 224 Two Dimensional Design

The basic art elements: color theory and two-dimensional composition; applied studio problems. Concentration on 2-D imaging creation is the focus of this course. Students use raster, vector, and layout programs to create original works. 


PR 233 Printing and Layout Design

The design and development of various types of layouts. Copy mark-up, styles in display, and principles of conventional and modern layouts covered. Software used include Adobe InDesign, Quark, and MS Publisher. 


PR 274 Computer Graphics

Students will use graphic software as tools to create various projects emphasizing different design and production capabilities. Using software such as Adobe Photoshop, Image Ready, Corel Paint Shop Pro and Illustrator, students will learn the basics of scanning, manipulation of digital images and creation of vector based artwork. 


History

HUM 253 Humanities Study of Another Culture

This study entails a tour of foreign capitals and other major cultural centers with a specific emphasis on examining the art, music, and literature of the region. A combination of travel (at least one week) and a minimum of 35 contact hours of lecture are requisite to course completion. 


HY 113 (HIST 1213) History of Western Civilization I

History of Western Civilization I, HY 113 (HIST 1213), is an introduction to western civilization from its beginnings in Egypt, Greece and Rome through the rise of Christian Europe, to 1600. The course emphasizes interaction with the wider world, including North Africa and the Western Hemisphere (Byzantium, Islam, and Worlds of the Atlantic Oceans).

*6 hours of Western Civilization recommended for UCA & UALR.


HY 123 (HIST 1223) History of Western Civilization II

Western Civilization II, HY 123 (HIST 1223), is a study of western civilization from 1600 to the present, emphasizing the sources and nature of European power down to the twentieth century. The course emphasizes interaction with the wider world, including European imperialism in Africa and Asia.

*6 hours of Western Civilization recommended for UCA & UALR.


HY 153 History of Arkansas

This course is a history of Arkansas’ social, political and economic development from pre-history to the present. It is highly recommended that students successfully complete HY 213 (HIST 2113) or HY 223 (HIST 2123) before enrolling in this course. 


HY 213 (HIST 2113) U.S. History to 1877

United States History to 1877, HY 213 (HIST 2113), surveys the social, political and economic history of the U.S. beginning with the European background and concluding with the Civil War.


HY 223 (HIST 2123) U.S. History Since 1877

HY 223 (HIST 2123), is a general survey of the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present.

Prerequisites


Honors Topic

HON 111, 112, 113 Phi Theta Kappa Honors

A seminar on the current Phi Theta Kappa Honors study topic. 

Prerequisites

  • GPA of 3.0 or higher, ACT composite of 21 or higher, or membership in Phi Theta Kappa or consent of instructor.

Humanities

HUM 113 Survey of African American Drama and Theatre

This course is designed for the student with little or no experience in the study of drama and theatre. The course will combine general instruction in the fundamental elements of drama and theatre with the specific study of African-American playwrights, drama and theater from minstrelsy and musical theatricals of the nineteenth century to the present. 


HUM 203 Leadership Development

Leadership skills are developed through study, observation and application. The course is rooted in self awareness and explores the concept of leadership in a variety of times, cultures, and contexts. A seminar environment promotes attainment of specific skills: visioning, decision- making, ethics, building trust, empowering others, servant leadership, change conflict resolution, and goal setting. 


HUM 263 Humanities Study of Another Culture

This course is a continuation of HUM 253 involving extended tours of foreign travel and studying at centers of cultural significance in the fine arts and humanities. Requirements include additional foreign travel (one week minimum) and 35 lecture hours in addition to the travel experience. 


Maintenance Mechanics Technology

MMT 113 Principles of Technology

Studies manufacturing processes and technological advancement which changes our careers. These changes affect our quality of life and standard of living. This course builds a firm foundation for understanding the impact of technology in the changing workplace, today’s technology and tomorrow’s technology. It is hoped that this material will stimulate continued exploration and discovery. 


MMT 114 Basic Electricity/Electronics I

An introductory study of AC and DC electrical/electronic fundamentals including construction, analysis, and diagnosis of DC circuits/circuit faults using associated test equipment. 


MMT 134 Basic Shop

An introductory course for industrial and commercial trades, designed to develop skills in machinery and equipment installation; the recognition and proficient use of measuring devices; and hand and power tools utilized in areas such as sheet metal, plumbing, machine shop, and air conditioning. 


MMT 144 Industrial Mechanics

A comprehensive study of the principles and applications of v-belts, flat belts, gears, chains, sprockets, and pulleys.


MMT 154 Programmable Controls

This course provides students with the fastest and most effective procedures for isolating and correcting problems with SLC-500 systems. In addition, students will learn how to perform editing, saving, and resorting memory. 


MMT 214 Machine Shop Technology I

An introductory study of operational principles, nomenclature, parts, maintenance, and development of skills in lathe and milling machine operations. 


MMT 224 Machine Shop Technology II

A continuation of MMT 214 with emphasis on repair of equipment using machine shop tools. 


MMTO 104 Fundamentals of Mechanics

A course designed to introduce a student to the fundamentals of mechanics through planned shop experiences. 


MMTO 114 Basic Shop

A fundamental course in manipulative skills including tool sharpening, painting, cold metal, piping, and basic component repair. 


Mathematics

MATH 1003 College Mathematics

This is a college level mathematics course designed for students in non-STEM majors. The course incorporates mathematics that helps students analyze, set up and solve problems in their various majors. Topics include a review of ratios and proportions, percents and metric conversion; Inductive and deductive reasoning; financial mathematics; topics in algebra such as solving linear and quadratic equations, solving inequalities, solving applied ratio, proportion and variation problems, graphing and analyzing graphs; topics in geometry; regression analysis and statistics. 

Prerequisites

  • 19 on or above on ACT Math; or 36 or above on Compass Algebra.

MS 000 Math Lab

This lab will provide supplemental academic support to students enrolled in Pre-Algebra (MS 1013), Elementary Algebra (MS 1023), or Intermediate Algebra (MS 1123). 


MS 1013 Pre-Algebra

This course is for students having inadequate preparation for MS 1023 and MS 143. The emphasis in this course is on the practice of skills that students need in the everyday world. Topics to be developed are basic arithmetic, metric measure, line and circle geometry, and pre-algebra. (Institutional credit only) 

Co-requisites


MS 1023 Elementary Algebra

This course provides an alternative to Basic Math. Topics include exponents, polynomials, factoring, linear equations, quadratic equations, graphs and functions. 

Prerequisites

  • 42 on the ASSET Numerical Skills assessment and 0-34 on the ASSET Intermediate Algebra assessment, or 49 on the COMPASS Pre-algebra assessment and 0-29 on COMPASS Algebra, or a C or better in MS 1013 Pre-Algebra

Co-requisites


MS 111 Graphics Calculators in Mathematics

This workshop is an introduction to the graphics calculator. Its purpose is to show how graphing calculators can be used in today’s math courses. 


MS 1123 Intermediate Algebra

A modern college-level course designed to prepare the student for College Algebra. Topics to be covered include fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, exponents, radicals, quadratics, linear equations, systems of linear equations, and graphs. 

Prerequisites

  • Score of 42 or above on Asset Numerical Skills and 35-38 on Asset Intermediate Algebra
  • or scores of 49 or above on Compass Pre-Algebra and 30-40 on Compass Algebra
  • or have earned a C or better in MS 1023 Elementary Algebra

MS 123 (MATH 1103) College Algebra

This is a modern college algebra course based upon a function approach with emphasis on the following: Critical thinking, Mathematical modeling, and appropriate use of technology. Topics covered include: polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and radical functions; graphing of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic equations; graphing and solution of inequalities; solution of systems of equations using a variety of methods including determinants and matrices; other topics include progression, binomial theorem, partial fractions and set theory. 

Prerequisites

  • A score of 19 or above on the ACT Math test, 39 or above on the ASSET Intermediate Algebra Assessment, or 41 or above on the COMPASS Algebra test, 460 on the SAT Qualitative Assessment, or a C or better in Intermediate Algebra.

MS 133 (MATH 1203) Trigonometry

Trigonometry, MS 133 (MATH 1203), studies the relationships that exist between the sides and angles of all triangles. It includes the study of trigonometric functions, identities, equations and applications. It is highly recommended that the student should have completed Intermediate Algebra, or the equivalent, with a “C” or better. 

Prerequisites

  • Two years of high school algebra, and either a 19 on the Enhanced ACT Match, 43 on the ASSET Intermediate Algebra Assess- ment, 460 or above on the Recentered SAT qualitative assessment, 66 or above on the COMPASS Algebra Test, or a C or better in MS 1123 Intermediate Algebra

MS 135 (MATH 1305) Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus, MS 135 (MATH 1305), prepares the student for Calculus. It is an integrated, unified course in algebra and trigonometry. Topics include functions (polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic) and their graphs, trigonom- etry (functions, identities, graphs, equations and applications) equations and inequalities, systems of equations, matrices, advanced methods in problem solving and graphical analysis. Students can receive credits in degree programs for either college algebra and trigonometry or pre-calculus, not both. A graphing calculator is required for this course. 


MS 143 Technical Mathematics

This mathematics course is designed to provide mathematical tools needed by student enrolled in selected technical and occupational (AAS) Programs. The course incorporates mathematics that helps students analyze, set up and solve problems in their various majors. Emphasis is placed upon the practical aspects of mathematics. It includes selected topics on the operation of Real Numbers; conversion of fractions, decimals and percents; ratios and proportion, percent and applications; measurement - which includes conversion between English and the Metric system; essentials of algebra, consumer/financial mathematics; statistics, graphs, and probability; topics in geometry. 

Prerequisites

  • A score of 16 or above on ACT Math; or 31 or above on Asset Intermediate Algebra; or 21 or above on Compass Algebra; or have earned a C or better in MS 1023 Elementary Algebra

MS 163 Finite Mathematics

Finite Mathematics provides an understanding between mathematics and the application of mathematics to real world problems. Topics to be covered include a review of algebra concepts, matrices, linear programming and the Simplex method, sets and counting, probability, and statistics. 


MS 173 Fundamentals of Geometry

Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy the General Education Requirements.

The course will cover topics in plane and solid geometry including a variety of topics related to triangles and polygons, measurements, coordinate geometry, ratio and similarity, deductive reasoning, vectors, rigid motion and symmetry. 


MS 183 (MATH 1003) College Mathematics

This is a college level mathematics course designed for students in non-STEM majors. The course incorporates mathematics that helps students analyze, set up and solve problems in their various majors. Topics include a review of ratios and proportions, percents and metric conversion; Inductive and deductive reasoning; financial mathematics; topics in algebra such as solving linear and quadratic equations, solving inequalities, solving applied ratio, proportion and variation problems, graphing and analyzing graphs; topics in geometry; regression analysis and statistics. 

Prerequisites

  • 19 on or above on ACT Math; or 36 or above on Compass Algebra.

MS 213 Applied Mathematics for Students of Science

A course designed to provide the mathematical skills needed for students of the physical, biological and health sciences. Topics covered include scientific notation, logarithms, electronic calculator, significant figures, statistics, graphing and functional relationships. 

Prerequisites

  • Intermediate Algebra or a score on the ACT/ASSET test sufficient for placement into College Algebra or into a math course as sophisticated as College Algebra.

MS 215 (MATH 2405) Calculus I

Calculus I, MS 215 (MATH 2405), is the first course in Calculus and includes topics of functions (including exponential, trigono- metric, and logarithmic), limits, continuity, differentiation, antiderivatives, inverse functions, and introduction to integration. It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed College Algebra (MS 123 (MATH 1103)) and Trigonometry (MS 133 (MATH 1203)), or the equivalent, with a “C” or better. 

Prerequisites


MS 2213 Mathematical Structures I

This course is designed for students majoring in elementary education. The course covers sets and logic, systems of numeration, number systems and operations, and elementary number theory. 


MS 2223 Mathematical Structures II

This course covers topics in geometry and measurement, statistics and probability and is designed for students majoring in elementary education. 


MS 223 (MATH 2203) Survey of Calculus

Survey of Calculus, MS 223 (MATH 2203), is designed for business, social sciences, life sciences and other related majors. The course includes topics in limits, differentiation, application of derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, integration and its application, techniques of Integration, and an introduction to functions of several variables. The emphasis will be on help- ing students understand how calculus relates to the real world. 


MS 225 (MATH 2505) Calculus II

Calculus II, MS 225 (MATH 2505) is a continuation of MS 215 (MATH 2405) which includes the following topics: integration by parts, sequences and series, parametric equations, polar coordinates, conic sections and vectors and curves in the planes. It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed Calculus I (MS 215 (MATH 2405)) and Trigonometry (MS 133 (MATH 1203)), or the equivalent, with a “C” or better. 


MS 233 (MATH 2603) Calculus III

MS 233 (MATH 2603), Calculus III, is the study of multi-dimensional calculus, including: multiple integration, partial differentiations, vector functions, and other topics. It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed Calculus II (MS 225 (MATH 2505)) with a “C” or better. 


MS 253 (MATH 2103) Math Statistics

Math Statistics, MS 253 (MATH 2103), is an algebra based course that covers descriptive and inferential statistical techniques and methods in life, physical, and social science. Topics include qualitative data analysis, frequency distributions, numeri- cal methods, data dispersions, variance analysis, estimation theory, sampling distributions, discrete and continuous probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and confidence interval estimation. 


Medical Laboratory Technology

MLS 114 Medical Lab Science Fundamentals

Clinical lab policies, use of general lab equipment, medical terminology, asepsis, and laboratory mathematics. Basic introduction to urinalysis, hematology, coagulation, serology, blood bank, bacteriology, parasitology and clinical chemistry. Supervised practice in lab is designed to develop basic skills and technical abilities necessary in future MLS courses. 


MLS 125 Hematology

Theory to include principles, testing, and pathological states in hematology and coagulation. Supervised practice in student lab designed to develop skills and technical abilities in hematology and coagulation. 


MLS 135 Immunology & Immunohematology

Theory of the immune process, antigen-antibody reactions and their application to diagnostic procedures. Blood banking theory to include ABO & RH systems, crossmatching, antibody detection and identification, processing of blood donors. Supervised practice in student lab designed to develop skills and technical abilities. 


MLS 202 Phlebotomy

Principles and techniques of specimen collection particularly blood collection by venipuncture and microsampling. 


MLS 205 Clinical Chemistry

Theory and application to include principles, testing, and pathological states in the area of urinalysis and clinical chemistry. Supervised practice in student lab designed to develop skills and technical abilities. 


MLS 212 Instrumentation

A study of the basic principles and functions of laboratory instruments, their operation, calibration and application. 


MLS 213 Selected Topics

Case studies with the evaluation of laboratory data, patient’s history and physical findings. 


MLS 215 Pathogenic Microbiology

Specimen source, morphology, cultural characteristics and secondary identification to include bio-chemical and serological identification of bacteria. Specimen source and morphological identification of parasites. Supervised practice in student lab designed to develop skills and technical abilities in bacteriology and parasitology. 


MLS 223 Clinical Experience I

Informal didactic review and supervised experience in clinical laboratory designed to develop additional skills and technical abilities in hematology and coagulation. Students are assigned to clinical affiliate for 4 weeks. 

Prerequisites

  • A minimum of “C” in all preclinical courses.

Co-requisites


MLS 243 Clinical Experience II

Informal didactic review and supervised experience in clinical laboratory designed to develop additional skills and technical abilities in chemistry and urinalysis. Students are assigned to clinical affiliate for 4 weeks. 

Prerequisites

  • A minimum of "C" in all preclinical courses.

MLS 263 Clinical Experience III

Informal didactic review and supervised experience in clinical laboratory designed to develop additional skills and technical abilities in blood banking and serology. Students are assigned to clinical affiliate for 4 weeks. 

Prerequisites

  • A minimum of “C” in all preclinical courses.

MLS 283 Clinical Experience IV

Informal didactic review and supervised experience in clinical laboratory designed to develop additional skills and technical abilities in microbiology. Students are assigned to clinical affiliate for 4 weeks. 

Prerequisites

  • A minimum of “C” in all preclinical courses.

MLS 292 MLT Seminar

A capstone seminar in medical technology focusing on the role of an MLT, professional ethics and laboratory related problems and presentation of students’ projects. 


Medical Professions Education

MPE 113 Introduction to Medical Professions

Experiences in the Introduction to Medical Professions course are designed to provide students with basic information and skills needed for a career in the health care field. In this comprehensive semester course, emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to Career and Technical Education Student Organizations (CTSOs), medical history and events, health care systems, health care careers, qualities of a successful health care worker, medical ethics and legal responsibilities, and nutrition and health. 


MPE 123 Introduction to Medical Procedures

This course allows students to develop specific skills needed in the health professions. Emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to the following areas: safety, infection control, vital signs, CPR and first aid, medical math, abbreviations, and charting. 


MPE 133 Medical Apprenticeship I

Designed by school faculty and industry representatives to provide classroom and laboratory experiences that prepare students for entry level employment in their career of choice and for entry into post-secondary training. Specialization experiences provided will meet guidelines for a Tech Prep/Apprenticeship program. The laboratory portion may be provided through cooperative/work-based learning, mentoring, apprenticeship, on-the-job-training, clinical experience and/or pre-employment training. 


MPE 143 Medical Apprenticeship II

This course is a continuation of MPE 133 and designed by school faculty and industry representatives to provide classroom and laboratory experiences that prepare students for entry level employment in their career of choice and for entry into post-secondary training. Specialization experiences provided will meet guidelines for a Tech Prep/Apprenticeship program. The laboratory portion may be provided through cooperative/ work-based learning, mentoring, apprenticeship, on-the-job-training, clinical experience and/or pre-employment training. 


Music

MSC 101 College Chorale

The college chorale is open to any student who wishes to sing. Previous training is not necessary. 


MSC 1011 Secondary Applied Music

These courses include vocal or instrumental instruction and are designed for the music minor. $20.00 lab fee. 


MSC 1012 Applied Music Concentration

These courses include vocal or instrumental instruction and are designed for the music major. $40.00 lab fee. 


MSC 1021 Secondary Applied Music

These courses include vocal or instrumental instruction and are designed for the music minor. $20.00 lab fee. 


MSC 1022 Applied Music Concentration

These courses include vocal or instrumental instruction and are designed for the music major. $40.00 lab fee. 


MSC 111 College Chorale

The college chorale is open to any student who wishes to sing. Previous training is not necessary. 


MSC 132 Sight-singing & Ear Training I


MSC 142 Sight-singing & Ear Training II


MSC 152 Beginning Piano for Elementary Education Majors

Beginning instruction in piano for elementary education majors. Emphasis will be placed upon learning the keyboard, musical and rhythmic notation and playing simple songs. 


MSC 153 Beginning Piano

Group piano lessons for the beginning adult with emphasis upon learning the keyboard, musical and rhythmic notation, and playing simple songs. 


MSC 163 Intermediate Piano

A continuation of MSC 153, Beginning Piano. 

Prerequisites


MSC 173 Class Voice I

Class voice is a practical course designed to develop the foundations in the art of singing. Emphasis is on the development of the voice for solo or ensemble performance. Each student will explore the music most suitable for his or her individual voice or singing style. Class work includes vocal technique, basic music reading, vocal exercises, performance and local styles. There will be both individual and group vocal work in class. 


MSC 2011 Secondary Applied Music

These courses include vocal or instrumental instruction and are designed for the music minor. $20.00 lab fee. 


MSC 2012 Applied Music Concentration

These courses include vocal or instrumental instruction and are designed for the music major. $40.00 lab fee. 


MSC 2021 Secondary Applied Music

These courses include vocal or instrumental instruction and are designed for the music minor. $20.00 lab fee. 


MSC 2022 Applied Music Concentration

These courses include vocal or instrumental instruction and are designed for the music major. $40.00 lab fee. 


MSC 221 College Chorale

The college chorale is open to any student who wishes to sing. Previous training is not necessary. 


MSC 223 (MUSC 1003) Music Appreciation

This is a music survey course. Basic concepts of music will be taught giving the student a knowledge and a love of music from the Baroque Period to the present. Students will study the elements and forms of selected musical works, composers, genres and periods. In addition, students will be introduced to a variety of musical instruments. 


MSC 231 College Chorale

The college chorale is open to any student who wishes to sing. Previous training is not necessary. 


MSC 233 Intermediate Music Training


MSC 243 Intermediate Music Training


Networking Technology

NT 123 MS Networking Essentials

This course will provide students with concepts related to supporting computer networks. Topics will include network security, TCP/IP protocols, routing and switching concepts, the OSI model and basic techniques related to physical cable installation. 


NT 133 Help Desk Support

This course is designed to provide the student with theory and procedures for supporting and troubleshooting the Microsoft Windows Operating System, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office and e-mail for the end user. Customer service and professionalism will also be emphasized. 


NT 143 Linux Operating Systems

The focus of this course is to provide students with introductory and advanced coverage of Linux System Administration. 

Prerequisites


NT 163 MS Active Directory Services

This course is designed to teach students how to configure server rolls including DNS, DHCP, file server rolls, print server rolls, and the configuration of IPv4 and IPv6 in servers. Proper methods of providing user access to various server resources and security concepts will also be introduced. 


NT 173 Network Management

This course is designed to teach students advanced topics in configuration of server rolls in a Windows Server Domain environment. Emphasis will also be placed on security of servers and load balancing.


NT 193 Maintaining and Managing PC’s

This course is designed to prepare students in the area of computer support services. Lecture and hands- on training will include computer diagnostics and repair, windows operating system troubleshooting, printer and peripheral device diagnosis and repair, desktop security topics, virus recognition and removal concepts. Customer service and professionalism will also be emphasized. 


NT 213 Information Security Essentials

This course provides a fundamental foundation in the essential elements of computer security. Topics will include understanding of security measures, techniques for securing systems, legal issues, basic intrusion detection and recovery methods. 


NT 253 Digital Image Production I

The course provides an introduction to the production and manipulation of digital images using industry recognized digital image recognition and enhancement software. The student will develop and apply computer image-editing skills through classroom and hands-on projects. 


NT 273 Digital Image Production II

Recommended completion of PR 103 and enrollment in PR 113. Study of animation techniques: storyboarding, 3-D Modeling, image maps and textures, lighting and motion studies and rendering options. 

Prerequisites


Nursing (ADN)

NG 107 Concepts of Nursing Care for Patients with Chronic, Stable Conditions

This course provides for the acquisition and application of fundamental concepts of nursing, including communication, collaboration, caring, and clinical judgment necessary for safe, quality, evidence-based, patient-centered nursing care to diverse adult and older adult patients experiencing chronic, stable conditions requiring physical and psychological nursing care. Emphasis is placed on microbial safety, quality improvement, professional standards, principles of management, and legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when caring for patients with chronic, stable conditions. Application of knowledge and skills occurs in the nursing skills laboratory and a variety of clinical settings. 


NG 123 Normal Nutrition

This course is an introduction to the basic science of nutrition and deals with normal nutrition in the healthy individual. Lifestyles, goals, culture, growth and development, and the meaning of food and eating are explored. 


NG 133 Dosage Calculation for Nurses

This non-required course focuses on enhancing speed and accuracy of math skills needed for drug dosage calculation. It is specifically designed to prepare the student to pass a Drug Dosage Calculation Exam, which is a requirement of each nursing course. 

Prerequisites

  • Acceptance into the ADN program.

Co-requisites


NG 209 Concepts of Nursing Care for Patients with Acute, Stable Conditions

This course provides for the acquisition and application of concepts of nursing, including communication, collaboration, caring, and clinical judgment necessary to provide and delegate safe, quality, evidence-based, patient-centered nursing care to diverse patients across the lifespan experiencing acute, stable mental health, medical, surgical, pediatric, and maternal conditions requiring physical and psychological nursing care. Emphasis is placed on quality improvement, professional standards, and legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when caring for patients with acute, stable conditions. Application of knowledge and skills occurs in the nursing skills laboratory and a variety of clinical settings. 


NG 212 Clinical Case Studies I

This course is a nursing, non-required elective. Computer-based clinical case studies offer opportunities for critical thinking, decision-making, and prioritization of nursing care. Selected HESI-RN Case Studies and HESI RN Patient Reviews that complement NG 312 course content are reviewed, and HESI computerized test questions are answered to provide students with an opportunity to prepare for taking the NCLEX-RN.


NG 222 Clinical Case Studies II

This course is a nursing, non-required elective. Computer-based clinical case studies offer opportunities for critical thinking, decision-making, and prioritization of nursing care. Selected HESI-RN Case Studies and HESI RN Patient Reviews are congruent with NG 412, Concepts of Care for Patients with Complex Conditions, course content are reviewed, and HESI computerized test questions are answered to provide students with an opportunity to prepare for taking the NCLEX-RN. 


NG 223 Pharmacology for Nurses

This course introduces the safe and therapeutic use of drugs in the care of clients. Current pharmacologic concepts and principles, as well as descriptions of pharmacokinetic characteristics of the prototype drugs have been incorporated. 


NG 312 Concepts of Nursing Care for Patients with Chronic and Acute, Unstable Conditions

This course provides for the acquisition and application of concepts of nursing, including communication, collaboration, caring, and clinical judgment necessary to provide, and delegate safe, quality, evidence-based, patient-centered nursing care to diverse patients across the lifespan experiencing chronic and acute unstable mental health, medical, surgical, pediatric, and maternal-infant conditions requiring nursing care. Emphasis is placed on quality improvement, professional standards, and legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when caring for patients with chronic and acute, unstable conditions. Application of knowledge and skills occurs in the nursing skills laboratory and a variety of clinical settings. 


NG 412 Concepts of Nursing Care for Patients with Complex Conditions

This course provides for the acquisition and application of concepts of nursing, including communication, collaboration, caring, and clinical judgment necessary to manage safe, quality, evidence-based, patient-centered nursing care to diverse patients across the lifespan experiencing complex medical, surgical, pediatric, and maternal-infant conditions requiring nursing care. Emphasis is placed on quality improvement, professional standards, and legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when caring for patients with complex conditions. Application of knowledge and skills occurs in the nursing skills laboratory and a variety of clinical settings. 


Nursing Assistant

NA 103 Nursing Assistant Clinical

This course provides students with an opportunity to engage in clinical learning experiences. Emphasis is placed on clinical competence of basic nursing assistant skills including communication, infection control, safety and emergency procedures, resident rights, feeding techniques, elimination procedures, skin care, transferring, positioning, and turning techniques, dressing, and range of motion exercises. 


NA 107 Nursing Assistant Theory

This course provides training in basic nursing assistant procedures including infection prevention and control, resident rights, transferring and positioning techniques, as well as activities of daily living. This course is based on the Arkansas Long-Term Care Facility Nursing Assistant Training curriculum and has been approved by the Arkansas Office of Long-Term Care. Graduates of this course are prepared to write the state of Arkansas Competency Examination for Nursing Assistants. 


Office Technology

OT 1033 Introduction to Keyboarding

Students will learn to operate the keyboard by touch, learn the proper use of the microcomputer, and begin development of speed, accuracy, and fluency in the keying of drills, exercises, and timings. 


OT 113 Medical Terminology I

The student will study and demonstrate the use of medical word stems, suffixes, and prefixes as related to the body systems and associated diseases. Proficiency in the pronunciation, spelling, and definitions of medical terms, the use of the medical dictionary and related reference materials will be emphasized. 


OT 1203 Administrative Support Internship

The student will be placed in a business office during their last semester under the direction of an agency supervisor and qualified faculty member. The student will have one required job placement and attend seminar classes to integrate classroom work with the internship. 

Prerequisites

  • Departmental approval.

OT 1213 Medical Office Internship

The student will be placed in a medical facility during their last semester under the direction of an agency supervisor and qualified faculty member. The student will have one required job placement and attend seminar classes to integrate classroom work with the internship. 

Prerequisites

  • Departmental approval.

OT 123 Medical Terminology II

This course is a continuation of OT 113. 


OT 1273 Medical Transcription

Provides training in transcribing original medical dictation including history and physical reports, chart notes, and other medical documents. Emphasizes proofreading skills, transcription speed and accuracy, and increased knowledge of medical terminology. 


OT 133 (BUSI 1103) Document Processing

Emphasis will be placed on speedbuilding, along with practice on the numeric keypad. This course will also include an introduction to formatting letters, reports, and tables using Microsoft Word. 

Prerequisites


OT 153 Introduction to Medical Coding

This course is designed to give students a basic introduction to coding in medical offices. Fall semester. 


OT 203 Computers in the Medical Office

This course is designed to familiarize students with the capabilities of a Medical Practice Management software program. Students will use a computer program to maintain patient files, store treatment information, match CRT and diagnosis codes with treatment procedure and charges, create insurance claim forms, follow the claims until they are reimbursed, and perform related tasks. 


OT 223 Administrative Support Procedures

Emphasis is placed on administrative practices and procedures used in a business office. Topics include personal development, interpersonal relations, customer service, telephone techniques, filing, and business etiquette. 


OT 243 Business Math Machines

This course reviews basic mathematical operations and presents typical business applications while offering instruction and practice in the proper use of electronic calculating equipment. 

Prerequisites


OT 263 Intermediate Medical Coding

A continuation of OT 153 dealing with Intermediate principles of coding using both ICD-9-CM AND CPT-4, focus is based on physicians office and outpatient settings. Experience with coding of medical records as well as use of an encoder and the administrative aspects of coding will be emphasized. Spring semester. 


OT 273 Machine Transcription

Provides training in the transcribing of documents from recordings using a microcomputer. Emphasizes proofreading skills and other aspects of producing accurate letters and transcripts. 


OT 284 Advanced Medical Coding

This continuation course prepares students for a coding position in a hospital or physician’s office and is designed to enhance medical coding knowledge and expertise through realistic practical applications. DRG coding principles and Evaluation and Management Coding will be emphasized. 


OT 292 CCS/CCS-P

This class is designed to prepare students to successfully complete the National Coding Exam to become either a Certified Coding Specialist (CCS) or a Certified Coding Specialist-Physician Based (CCS-P). Summer semester. 

Prerequisites


Philosophy

PHIL 153 (PHIL 1103) Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy, PHIL 153 (PHIL 1103), serves as a general introduction to philosophy for majors and non-majors alike. It is a survey course of the major contributions to philosophical thought, primarily within the western tradition and examines human values, critical thinking and the nature of reality and knowledge.


PHIL 213 Ethics of Christianity

 A course that studies the ethics of Christianity, including its system of human responsibility and patterns of conduct. 


Phlebotomy

PLB 113 Phlebotomy Procedures

Basic anatomy and physiology of body systems involved in phlebotomy sites; collection equipment and techniques involved in performance of venipuncture. 

Prerequisites

  • Acceptance into the program.

Co-requisites


PLB 116 Phlebotomy Skills

Performing and managing specimen collections in the health care setting. 


PLB 123 Special Techniques

The health care setting, medical terminology, collection equipment and techniques involved in skin punctures, special collection procedures, quality control and assurance procedures, interpersonal skills and health care safety and liability requirements. 


Physical Education

PE 102 Teaching Tennis

This course emphasizes teaching methods and skill proficiency. This course is recommended for physical education majors. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PE 223 (HEAL 1003) Health and Safety

Health and Safety, PE 223 (HEAL 1003), is a study of the principles and concepts of health and safety for optimal wellness, including both personal and community wellness. The course requires reading and studying the text. In addition, a lecture outline and other study aids are available on the Web for each chapter. Reading and written assignments will be given for chapters 3-16. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PE 233 Principles and Problems of Coaching

A study of the principles, problems, and other aspects of athletic programs that coaches face during their careers. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PE 243 First Aid

The training of individuals to render competent first aid in case of injury or illness until the services of medical personnel can be secured. Upon successful completion of this course, students receive certification cards from American Red Cross. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 101 Beginning Bowling

Instruction and participation in bowling.

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 111 Intermediate Bowling

Instruction and participation in the advanced bowling skills. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 

Prerequisites


PEAC 1121 Beginning Soccer

Instruction and participation in soccer. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 1131 Intermediate Soccer

Instruction and participation in advanced skills, techniques, and strategies of soccer. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 

Prerequisites


PEAC 1141 Softball

Instruction and participation in softball. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 1151 Yoga

Yoga is a system of exercises for attaining bodily or mental control and well-being. Yoga is a combination of traditional Eastern yoga disciplines with new dynamic techniques. It is designed to make the participant feel longer and stronger, reduce pain and relieve stress. Using a combination of power Yoga and Pilates this class will strengthen, stretch and relax the participants body. Yoga begins with a progressive series of postures to warm the muscles and prepare the body for the strength and core conditioning exercises. The relaxation and meditation is the perfect ending. Each participant will need to bring his or her own mat and towel. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 121 Badminton/Pickleball

Instruction and participation in badminton and pickleball. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 131 Physical Conditioning

Basic conditioning including weight training, stretching, and aerobic workouts on the exercise equipment in the Fitness Center. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 141 Weight Training

Instruction and participation in weight training. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 142 Fitness Concepts

Provides knowledge and appreciation of the importance of lifelong fitness and well-being through physical activity. Course design includes classroom lectures, fitness evaluations, and participation in a lifelong physical activity. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 143 Concepts of Fitness & Wellness

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the students with the concepts and values of physical fitness, proper nutrition, weight management, stress management and the risks attached to negative lifestyle behaviors. Students will learn to evaluate their fitness, nutrition, body fat, and stress levels, identify their goals, and write their own exercise prescriptions. Classes will be conducted in both the classroom and Fitness Center. 


PEAC 151 Recreational Games

Instruction and participation in a variety of recreational games. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 171 Aerobic Exercise

Teaches low-impact routines for improved physical fitness. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 181 Beginning Golf

Includes basic fundamentals, history, terminology and scoring of golf. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 191 Intro to Dance

Practice in the basic movements of jazz, ballet and tap dance. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 211 Beginning Volleyball

Instruction and participation in volleyball. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 221 Beginning Tennis

Instruction and participation in tennis.

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 231 Intermediate Tennis

A continuation of the fundamentals of tennis with emphasis on the advanced skills, strategy, and knowledge of doubles play. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 

Prerequisites


PEAC 241 Fitness Walking/Jogging

Instruction and participation in vigorous walking/jogging for cardiovascular development and improvement. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 251 Beginning Basketball

Instruction and participation in basketball. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 261 Advanced Aerobic Exercise

Offers more vigorous routines for further toning and general fitness. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 271 Flag Football

Instruction and participation in flag football. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 281 Intermediate Golf

Advanced skill techniques and strategies of golf are developed. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 

Prerequisites


PEAC 291 Martial Arts

Basic skills and techniques of the martial arts. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 


PEAC 2911 Martial Arts II

This course will cover the requirements needed to gain ranks of blue through green belts in martial arts. It will also acquaint students with the advanced history, philosophy and terminology of martial arts through lecture and physical activities. 

Only PEAC courses will meet the activity requirements for graduation or transfer in general education. 

Prerequisites


Physics

PS 1131 Physical Science Lab

This is a one-credit hour laboratory course in physical science. Students take part in experiments and other activities which emphasize velocity and acceleration, forces, gravitation, thermodynamics; and electricity and magnetism. Most experiments involve the use of computer automated data collection and analysis. This course is offered only to students who have three credit hours of lecture in Physical Science, PS 113, or its equivalence. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all Physics courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 

Prerequisites

  • PS 113 or its equivalence.

PS 114 (PHSC 1004) Physical Science

Physical Science, PS 114 (PHSC 1004), is a general survey course of the physical sciences designed for general education. Course includes topics in physics and chemistry, and may also include other physical science topics. Lab required.

This is an algebra-based course and it is strongly recommended that the student should have completed Elementary Algebra with a “C” or better. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all Physics courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


PS 144 (PHSC 1204) Introduction to Astronomy

PS 144 (PHSC 1204) is a general one-semester survey of astronomy course. The course includes a basic study of the solar system, stars, galaxies, and the rest of the universe. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all Physics courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


PS 215 (PHYS 2014) General Physics

General Physics, PS 215 (PHYS 2014), which is an Algebra and trigonometry-based physics course and is not recommended for physics and engineering majors. Topics include mechanics in one and two dimensions, fluids, thermodynamics, and mechanical waves and sound. Lab required. It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed College Algebra with a “C” or better. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all Physics courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 

Prerequisites


PS 225 (PHYS 2024) General Physics II

General Physics II, PS 225 (PHYS 2024), is a trigonometry-based survey of the principles of classical electromagnetism and optics (topics covered include electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics). 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all Physics courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


PS 235 (Phys 2034) Technical Physics I

Technical Physics I, PS 235 (PHYS 2034), is a calculus-based physics course designed for science and engineering majors. Topics include mechanics in one and two dimensions, fluids, and heat. Lab required. This is a calculus-based course and it is strongly recommended that the student should take Calculus I as a co-requisite or have completed Calculus I with a “C” or better. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all Physics courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


PS 245 (PHYS 2044) Technical Physics II

Technical Physics II, PS 245 (PHYS 2044), is designed to provide a foundation in elementary classical electromagnetism for students of science and engineering. This is a calculus-based course and it is strongly recommended that the student should have completed both Calculus I and Calculus-Based Physics I with a “C” or better and should take Calculus II as a co-requisite. 

*A laboratory fee of $10.00 will be assessed for all Physics courses. This fee does not cover damage or breakage of nonexpendable equipment. 


Political Science

PLS 113 Introduction to Politics

PLS 113, Introduction to Politics is a survey of the discipline of political science designed to introduce students to important theories, concepts, and issues in the study of political behavior, phenomena, and processes. The course will cover the major subfields of political science: including political theory, research methods, American government, comparative politics, public administration, public policy and international relations. 


PLS 213 (PLSC 2003) American Federal Government

American Federal Government, PLS 213 (PLSC 2003), examines the Federal Government beginning with the Constitution, Congress, the PresidencyandtheSupremeCourt. Studentswillbeabletoarticulatedefinitionsofimportanttermsandbeabletoanalyzeimportantrelation- ships between the electoral process, governmental institutions, and policy outcomes. The introduction to the principles, structure, processes and functions of the United States Federal Government and other related political activities. 


PLS 223 (PLSC 2103) State and Local Government

State and Local Government, PLS 223 (PLSC 2103), is designed to provide the student with basic knowledge of the workings of state and local governments and their relationship with the federal government. It focuses on organization, structure, function, and administration of state and local government. This course examines the relationships between the national government and state/local governments. It ad- dresses issues of education, criminal justice, economic development and social services. It also examines the various roles of political leaders and interest groups at the state and local levels. 


PLS 233 Introduction to Comparative Politics

PLS 233, Introduction to Comparative Politics is a study of the concepts and methods of comparative politics. Special emphasis is given to comparing the types and forms of political systems and the political processes they undergo. 


Psychology

PSY 213 (PSYC 1103) General Psychology

General Psychology, PSY 213 (PSYC 1103), provides an overview of the major topics of modern psychology. It introduces the fundamental concepts, principles, and theories that are utilized to provide a scientific analysis of human behavior and study of the adaptation of the individual to his physical and social environment. 


PSY 223 (PSYC 2103) Human Growth and Development

Human Growth and Development, PSY 223 (PSYC 2103), provides an overview of the study of maturational and environmental factors in human growth and development. It examines the typical physical, cogni- tive, and social-emotional changes as they occur in each period of the lifespan: Prenatal, Infancy and Toddlerhood, Early Childhood, Middle Childhood, Adolescence, Early Adulthood, Late Adulthood. Students will study major developmental theories in terms of how they explain changes that occur over the lifespan. 

Prerequisites


PSY 243 Abnormal Psychology

This course includes the study of the characteristics and treatment of abnormal behavior. Special emphasis is given to causes, symptoms, course and treatment of behavioral illnesses and diseases. 

Prerequisites


Real Estate

RE 103 Real Estate Law

Deals with national laws that affect real estate transactions to determine their legality and enforceability. 


RE 113 Real Estate Principles and Practices

Deals with the “why” and “how” of real estate as it affects individuals and business forms. The growing involvement of government in the problems of urban redevelopment, rehabilitation, and urban planning is carefully developed. 


RE 123 Real Estate Appraising

Directed toward teaching those skills necessary to appraise a parcel of real property to determine a fair and just estimate of the value. 


Renewable Energy Technology

RET 101 Sustainable Communities and Energy Conservation

This is a survey course which promotes an awareness of conservation and building sustainable communities with an emphasis on applying green technologies. 


RET 103 Intro to Renewable Energy Tech

This course introduces the concepts, methodologies, and sources of renewable energy. Energy production and the environmental impacts from the use of fossil fuels will be compared with alternative forms of energy, including hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal, tidal, and nuclear energies. Upon completion, students should have a thorough understanding of renewable energy technology and its impact on humans and the environment. 


RET 113 Biofuels

This course introduces the history and early applications of Biodiesel and ethanol. Understanding biochemical methods involved in the generation of Biodiesel from feedstocks, animal fats, and waste vegetable oil. Structure, function and production of ethanol and its uses. Social, environmental, and economical aspects of the production and usage of alternative fuels. Exploring the new advancements in alternative fuel production.


RET 124 Biomass & Feedstocks & Lab

A detailed study of the form, structure, function and reproduction of plants and the production, handling, and maintenance of biomass in the alternative fuels industry. 


RET 134 Bioprocess Practices & Lab

This course involves in depth examination of the methods utilized in the production of biofuel throughout the plant manufacturing process. The laboratory provides a hands-on experience of producing and testing biofuel. 


Sociology

SY 213 (SOCI 1013) Fundamentals of Sociology

Fundamental Sociology, SY 213 (SOCI 1013), is a disciplined and objective study of human social relationships and group interaction. The course includes the examination of the structures and processes of human interaction in an attempt to understand how humans actually behave and the consequences of this behavior. 


SY 223 The Family

A study of the development of family, courtship, mate selection, and adjustment to problems in marriage. Emphasizes factors influencing the organization and disorganization of the family. 


Spanish

SH 111 Introduction to Spanish Conversation

Introduction to Spanish Conversation is designed to develop oral language skills at the beginning level. 


SH 113 (SPAN 1013) Beginning Spanish

Beginning Spanish I, SH 113, initiates the student to the development of basic skills and building vocabulary through daily speaking, writ- ing and reading Spanish. Class-time is devoted to explanation, written and oral practice. Homework will focus on reading, writing, and pronunciation. Handouts, in-class discussions and projects will promote cultural awareness. Spanish I is a beginning course designed to help students develop a basic proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The instruction is communicatively oriented and emphasizes the everyday life and culture of Spanish-speaking people. 


SH 123 (SPAN 1023) Beginning Spanish II

Beginning Spanish II, SH 123 (SPAN 1023), continues the development of basic skills and building vocabulary through daily speaking, writing and reading Spanish. Class-time is devoted to explanation, written and oral practice. Homework will focus on reading, writing and pronunciation. Handouts, in-class discussions and projects will promote cultural awareness. SH123 is a continuation of SH113. It seeks to further develop a basic proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The instruction is communicatively oriented and emphasizes the everyday life and culture of Spanish speaking people.

It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed SH 113 (SPAN 1013) with a “C” or better. 

Prerequisites


SH 213 (SPAN 2013) Intermediate Spanish

Intermediate Spanish, SH 213 (SPAN 2013), continues developing a basic Spanish vocabulary and ability to communicate in the local Spanish-speaking community and in Spanish- speaking countries. Class time is devoted to explanation, written and oral practice. Homework will focus on reading, writing and pronunciation. Handouts, in-class discussions and projects will promote cultural awareness. SH 213 (SPAN 2013) is designed to help the student develop an intermediate-level proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The instruction is communicatively oriented and emphasizes the everyday life and culture of Spanish-speaking people. It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed SH 123 (SPAN 1023) with a “C” or better. 


SH 223 (SPAN 2023) Intermediate Spanish

Intermediate Spanish, SH 223 (SPAN 2023), is designed to help students develop an intermediate-level proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The instruction is communicatively oriented and emphasized the everyday life and culture of Spanish-speaking people. It is strongly recommended that the student should have completed SH 213 (SPAN 2013) with a "C" or better grade.

Prerequisites


SH 233 Spanish Conversation I

A course in basic Spanish conversation designed to develop oral language skills at the intermediate level. 

Prerequisites


SH 243 Spanish Conversation II

This course is a continuation of SH 233. Practical strategies for effective communication in Spanish will be emphasized. 


Speech

SP 123 (DRAM 1003) Introduction to Theatre

Introduction to Theatre, SP 123 (DRAM 1003), is an introductory survey of theatre arts including history, dramatic works, stage techniques, theatre crafts, and production procedures, as it relates to the fine arts, society, and the individual.


SP 253 Advanced Speech

A continuation of the Fundamentals of Speech course including public speaking, oratory, radio/TV and special occasion speeches. 


SP 263 Oral Interpretation

Basic principles of analysis and presentation of prose, poetry, and drama for oral communication. Development of voice and body as instruments of expression. 


SP 273 Basic Acting Techniques

First essential of acting study: exploration of the actor. This course will include class exercises to develop relaxation, concentration, imagination and improvisational skills. This course will include Monologue study and audition techniques. 

Prerequisites

  • Permission of instructor.

THEA 113 Technical Direction

The study of technical direction and production management, theatre terminology, scenic shop and stage organization, rigging safety, materials control and supply ordering. 


THEA 123 Technical Direction

The study of budgeting, personnel, scheduling, engineering, theatre forms, production analysis, and logistic problems involved in technical direction. 


Welding

WG 115 Introduction to Welding

This course is a foundation that covers the principles and procedures for various welding applications. Students will have hands-on experience using oxy-fuel cutting, plasma cutting, air carbon, arc cutting, exothermic cutting, and arc and oxyacetylene welding. 


WG 1152 Introduction to Welding II

This course is a continuation of WG 1153 and completes the requisite for the student to receive credit for WG 115. WG 1152 acts as a second semester follow-up to WG 1153 for Secondary Technical Center students. 


WG 1153 Introduction to Welding I

A first part of offering from the curriculum course WG 115, but broken down into two (2) semesters to more appropriately fit into the schedules of Secondary Technical Center students. 


WG 125 Arc Welding I

This course is designed to teach Shielded Metal Arc Welding applications in welding mild, steel, flat and horizontal position.


WG 133 Welding Blueprint Reading

This course is designed to acquaint welding students with the fundamentals of reading welding blueprints and interpreting welding symbols according to the American Welding Society Standards inspections. 


WG 135 Arc Welding II

This course is designed to give the student practical experience in welding joints and beads on light gauge steels and thick metals such as structural steels in the vertical and overhead. 


WG 145 Inert Gas Welding I

This course provides instruction and practical application in gas tungsten arc welding (tig) and gas metal arc welding (mig). 


WG 155 Pipe Welding

This course will consist of welding V-Butt joints on plate steel found in the welding of pipe. 

Prerequisites


WG 165 Inert Gas Welding II

This course emphasizes welding applications of ferrous, nonferrous, stainless steel and alloy metals in horizontal, vertical and overhead positions. 


WG 175 Certification Welding

Students are required to study and practice qualifications to take American Welding Society (AWS) performance tests. These tests consist of destructive, and nondestructive, guided bend, acid, tensile, magnetic, dye penetrate, radiographic, ultra sonic, microscopic, eddy current, and visual inspections. 

Prerequisites


Word Processing

WP 183 Desktop Publishing

This course will teach users to create and print documents that contain both text and graphics using MS Publisher or InDesign. 

Prerequisites